top of page
  • Writer's pictureGig Harbor Living Local

New Foundation Wealth Group Brings You Three Keys to More Successful Investing

New Foundation Wealth Group Brings You Three Keys to More Successful Investing

A successful investor maximizes gain and minimizes loss

Article Courtesy of Nancy Harris, CMFC, CDFA, President, LPL Financial Planner, New Foundation Wealth Group

Though there can be no guarantee that any investment strategy will be successful, and all investing involves risk, including the possible loss of principal, here are basic principles that may help you invest more successfully.


Compounding

Put simply, compounding pays you earnings on your reinvested earnings. The longer you leave your money at work for you, the more exciting the numbers get. For example, imagine an investment of $10,000 at an annual rate of return of 8 percent. In 20 years, assuming no withdrawals, your $10,000 investment would grow to $46,610. In 25 years, it would grow to $68,485, a 47 percent gain over the 20-year figure. After 30 years, your account would total $100,627. (Of course, this is a hypothetical example that does not reflect the performance of any specific investment.)

This simple example also assumes that no taxes are paid along the way, so all money stays invested. That would be the case in a tax-deferred individual retirement account or qualified retirement plan.

While you should review your portfolio on a regular basis, the point is that money left alone in an investment offers the potential of a significant return over time. With time on your side, you don't have to go for investment "home runs" in order to be successful.


Asset Allocation

Asset allocation is the process by which you spread your dollars over several categories of investments, usually referred to as asset classes. The three most common asset classes are stocks, bonds, and cash or cash alternatives such as money market funds. A basic asset allocation would likely include at least stocks, bonds (or mutual funds of stocks and bonds), and cash or cash alternatives.

There are two main reasons why asset allocation is important. First, the mix of asset classes you own is a large factor in determining your overall investment portfolio performance. In other words, the basic decision about how to divide your money between stocks, bonds and cash can be more important than your subsequent choice of specific investments.

Second, by dividing your investment dollars among asset classes that do not respond to the same market forces in the same way at the same time, you can help minimize the effects of market volatility while maximizing your chances of return in the long term.


Dollar Cost Averaging

Dollar cost averaging is systematically purchasing a fixed dollar amount at regularly scheduled intervals over an extended time. When the price is high, your fixed-dollar investment buys less; when prices are low, the same dollar investment will buy more shares. A regular, fixed-dollar investment should result in a lower average price per share than you would get buying a fixed number of shares at each investment interval.

Remember that, just as with any investment strategy, dollar cost averaging can't guarantee you a profit or protect you against a loss if the market is declining. To maximize the potential effects of dollar cost averaging, you should also assess your ability to keep investing even when the market is down.

Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a registered investment advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC.

5 views0 comments

Comments


bottom of page